The Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology

The Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology provides leadership in biomedical research on animal and human diseases and assists with the health and humane care of research animals within the Institution.

 

The John D. Strandberg Fund

Dr. John D. Strandberg’s career as a scientist, pathologist, leader, and mentor has profoundly influenced the veterinarians and scientists he worked with and trained. He directed the department’s training program for twenty-six years. He did so as a true labor of love, and we wish to honor this legacy.

With a generous lead gift from Dr. Strandberg’s long-time colleague and friend, Linda C. Cork, the Department established the John D. Strandberg Fund to honor his dedication to young scientists. The Fund will be a flexible source of support for trainees to help provide equipment, and supplies, and to facilitate travel to meetings. As it grows, the Fund will provide critically important stipends for trainees while they study for their board examinations.

Continuing support from Johns Hopkins alumni and others will ensure that Dr. Strandberg’s magnificent dedication to science will be shared with future generations of veterinary pathologists and laboratory animal veterinarians.

About John D. Strandberg

Dr. Strandberg directed the Comparative Pathology and Laboratory Animal Medicine Training Programs at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine for three decades. He also was Director of the Division of Comparative Medicine for 17 years. During his tenure at Johns Hopkins, Dr. Strandberg had a tremendous impact on the field of comparative pathology and laboratory animal medicine, mentoring over 60 young pathologists and laboratory animal veterinarians, serving on national committees that developed policies for the humane use of research animals, participating in NIH study sections and site visits, and pursuing his research interests resulting in over 120 peer-reviewed publications.

The breadth and depth of Dr. Strandberg’s knowledge seemed infinite. Yet he always shared it with humility and compassion and an abundance of humor. Dr. Strandberg’s friends and colleagues remember him as a truly kind and generous person who readily shared his home with traveling scholars, cooked elaborate, delicious meals to congratulate each veterinary pathology trainee as he or she moved on to the next stage in their lives, played the piano for his frequent house guests, and often gave his lunch to homeless people on his way to work. Each of us is infinitely better for having known Dr. John Strandberg.

JOHN D. STRANDBERG, D.V.M., PH.D., D.A.C.V.P., 1939-2009

August 6, 2009-John D. Strandberg, Distinguished Member of the American College of Veterinary Pathologists and former director of the Division of Comparative Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, passed away on Aug. 1 in St. Paul, Minn. after a long illness. He was 69.

Strandberg was director of the Division of Comparative Medicine (now the Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology from 1982 to 1999 and built a strong division that provided clinical care and pathological expertise for biomedical research involving animals. In addition to his tenure as director, he directed the Comparative Pathology and Laboratory Animal Medicine Training programs at Johns Hopkins for three decades, mentoring more than 60 pathologists and laboratory animal veterinarians.

“He was a beloved teacher and mentor for many faculty and students,” says M. Christine Zink, D.V.M., Ph.D., professor and director of the Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology at Johns Hopkins. ”He established Johns Hopkins as a major force in the use of animal models to study the mechanisms of diseases, such as cancer and AIDS.”

Strandberg, a research pathologist, collaborated widely and served on several national committees that developed policies for the humane use of research animals, Strandberg also participated in NIH study sections and site visits, while pursuing his own research interests, particularly on prostate cancer. He left his mark on more than 120 peer-reviewed publications.

“The breadth and depth of Dr. Strandberg’s knowledge seemed infinite, yet he always shared it with humility and compassion and an abundance of humor,” says Janice Clements, Ph.D., the Mary Wallace Stanton Professor of Faculty Affairs, Vice Dean for Faculty and professor of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology. “His friends and colleagues remember him as a truly kind and generous person who readily shared his home with traveling scholars, cooked elaborate, delicious meals to congratulate each veterinary trainee as he or she moved on to the next stage in their lives, played the piano for his frequent house guests and often gave his lunch to homeless people on his way to work.”

Sandberg is survived by his sister, Jean Strandberg Goldstein, of Columbia, Mo and two brothers, William Strandberg of Alexandria, MN and Paul Strandberg of Roseville, MN. A memorial service in Strandberg’s honor will be held in Baltimore in September. Memorial contributions may be made to the John D. Strandberg Fund to support future trainees.